When to Rotate Your Tires and Align Wheels

Tire rotation is a preventative measure you should take a few times a year. Doing this will extend the life of your tires and allow you to get the most miles out of them. Tire rotation means moving the tires to different positions on your vehicle to promote even tread wear on all four tires. It doesn’t matter how you drive, front and rear tires wear at different rates. Tire rotations in Hutto TX make sure that you get the longest tread life from every tire and regular rotations are especially important if you have an all-wheel drive.

Tire, or wheel, alignment refers to an adjustment of your vehicle’s suspension, which is the system connecting a vehicle to its wheels. Proper alignment means adjusting the angles of the tires so they can efficiently make contact with the road.

How Often Should I Get a Tire Rotation?

You should bring your car into Christian Brothers Automotive of Hutto every 5,000 miles or at least every six months. If you drive aggressively, over potholes or debris, or you don’t keep your tires properly inflated, you need tire rotations more often. Going too long between tire rotations can result in a wear pattern that can’t be fixed, no matter where the tire is moved on the vehicle.

How Do I Know If I Need Tire Alignment?

There are several ways to tell if your vehicle needs tire alignment. These signs include:

  • Uneven tread wear
  • Vehicle pulling to the left or right
  • Steering wheel is off center when driving straight
  • Steering wheel vibrates

Types of Tire Rotation

Front-to-rear

  • For front-wheel drive vehicles
  • Front tires move straight back to the rear
  • Rear tires cross to opposite sides on front
  • Used when rear tires show uneven wear

Forward cross

  • For front-wheel drive vehicles
  • Front tires move straight back to the rear
  • Rear tires cross to opposite sides on front
  • Used when rear tires show uneven wear

X pattern

  • For all types of vehicles
  • Front tires shift to opposite rear positions
  • rear tires cross to opposite front positions
  • Used when there’s uneven wear

Rearward cross

  • For all-wheel, rear-wheel or four-wheel drive vehicles
  • Rear tires move straight up to front
  • Front tires cross to opposite rear positions
  • Used when there’s uneven front-tire wear

Side-to-side

  • For staggered wheels
  • Front two tires are moved to opposite sides on front axle
  • Rear two tires are moved to opposite sides on back axle
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