Auto Repair Estimates for Brakes

Whether you drive your car long distances on a regular basis or you stay close to home with a short commute and local errands, your car will eventually require brake service of some kind.

Most brake repairs involve work related to the brake’s main parts, ranging from the master cylinder and brake lines to the brake pads, rotors, and calipers. Ask a technician at your local auto shop to help you establish a regular maintenance schedule for your brakes and other parts of your car. A minor brake problem can turn into a damaging situation with a high repair cost when left unattended.

Familiarize yourself with these basic parts of your brake system, and you’ll be able to better communicate with your local mechanic when you discuss your auto repair estimate:

Master Cylinder
Normally reliable and experiencing few malfunctions, master cylinders can, however, develop internal leaks. When left unattended, the leak can cause the brake pedal to work intermittently or fail altogether. A warning light on your dashboard will alert you if your master cylinder has failed.

Brake Fluid
Healthy brake fluid is clear or slightly yellow in color. If you notice the fluid has turned dark or is dirty, ask your mechanic to change the brake fluid. Your brake fluid should be checked at each of your service appointments.

Brake Lines
Brake lines are composed of steel tubes and rubber hoses, and they provide a way for brake fluid to travel from the master cylinder to the wheels. Any failed pathway will need to be replaced immediately by your mechanic.

Brake Pads
Brake pads wear down and require periodic replacement. When checked and replaced routinely, you can avoid costly repairs to your car’s rotors, which can be adversely affected when the brake pads are left in poor condition.

Rotors
Rotors incur wear and tear over time due to friction with the brake pad and the brakes. Just like every part of your brakes, your rotors will require service and replacement throughout the life of your car.

Calipers
Essential to your car’s ability to stop and start, calipers fit over the rotor like a clamp. If the calipers lock, your brake pads will wear down quickly and ultimately damage the rotor.